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Posts Tagged: Entomological Society of America

International Exposure for Three UC Davis-Affiliated Photographers

This winning image of a wasp mimic, Ceriana tridens, ovipositing in the fissures of a tree, will be showcased at the Entomological Society of America meeting in November in Vancouver,B.C. (Photo by Alexander Nguyen)

Images by three UC Davis-affiliated photographers will be among those displayed at the international Insect Salon photography competition at the Entomological Society of America's meeting, Nov. 11-14 in Vancouver, B.C. The insect photographers:...

This winning image of a wasp mimic, Ceriana tridens, ovipositing in the fissures of a tree, will be showcased at the Entomological Society of America meeting in November in Vancouver,B.C. (Photo by Alexander Nguyen)
This winning image of a wasp mimic, Ceriana tridens, ovipositing in the fissures of a tree, will be showcased at the Entomological Society of America meeting in November in Vancouver,B.C. (Photo by Alexander Nguyen)

This winning image of a wasp mimic, Ceriana tridens, ovipositing in the fissures of a tree, will be showcased at the Entomological Society of America meeting in November in Vancouver,B.C. (Photo by Alexander Nguyen)

This winning image of a leafcutter bee, Megachile fidelis, showing the bee carrying a petal to her nest, won a spot in the international Insect Salon photo competition. (Photo by Allan Jones)
This winning image of a leafcutter bee, Megachile fidelis, showing the bee carrying a petal to her nest, won a spot in the international Insect Salon photo competition. (Photo by Allan Jones)

This winning image of a leafcutter bee, Megachile fidelis, showing the bee carrying a petal to her nest, won a spot in the international Insect Salon photo competition. (Photo by Allan Jones)

This winning image, accepted in the international Insect Salon photo competition, shows a  honey bee covered with pollen from mustard.  (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This winning image, accepted in the international Insect Salon photo competition, shows a honey bee covered with pollen from mustard. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This winning image, accepted in the international Insect Salon photo competition, shows a honey bee covered with pollen from mustard. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A B-Day Celebration for Robbin Thorp at the Bohart Museum of Entomology

Tabatha Yang, education and outreach coordinator for the Bohart Museum of Entomology, serves dessert at Robbin Thorp's birthday celebration while the distinguished emeritus professor reads the birthday wishes. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It was "b-day" today at The Bohart Museum of Entomology in honor of longtime Bohart associate Robbin Thorp, distinguished emeritus professor of entomology at the University of California, Davis. Bohart associates sang "Happy Birthday" and cheered when...

Tabatha Yang, education and outreach coordinator for the Bohart Museum of Entomology, serves dessert at Robbin Thorp's birthday celebration while the distinguished emeritus professor reads the birthday wishes. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Tabatha Yang, education and outreach coordinator for the Bohart Museum of Entomology, serves dessert at Robbin Thorp's birthday celebration while the distinguished emeritus professor reads the birthday wishes. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Tabatha Yang, education and outreach coordinator for the Bohart Museum of Entomology, serves dessert at Robbin Thorp's birthday celebration while the distinguished emeritus professor reads the birthday wishes. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis doctoral student Charlotte Herbert Alberts created the longhorned bees on Robbin Thorp's card--putting bees in the
UC Davis doctoral student Charlotte Herbert Alberts created the longhorned bees on Robbin Thorp's card--putting bees in the "double b's of his name. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis doctoral student Charlotte Herbert Alberts created the longhorned bees on Robbin Thorp's card--putting bees in the "double b's of his name. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Robbin Thorp is the co-author of two books that line the gift shop of the Bohart Museum of Entomology:  Bumble Bees of California: An Identification Guide (2014, Princeton University Press)  and California Bees and Blooms: A Guide for Gardeners and Naturalists (2014, Heyday Books). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Robbin Thorp is the co-author of two books that line the gift shop of the Bohart Museum of Entomology: Bumble Bees of California: An Identification Guide (2014, Princeton University Press) and California Bees and Blooms: A Guide for Gardeners and Naturalists (2014, Heyday Books). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Robbin Thorp is the co-author of two books that line the gift shop of the Bohart Museum of Entomology: Bumble Bees of California: An Identification Guide (2014, Princeton University Press) and California Bees and Blooms: A Guide for Gardeners and Naturalists (2014, Heyday Books). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

High Honor for Emily Bick: ESA Student Certification Award

A crab spider snares a Lygus bug. Emily Bick, for her doctorate, is behaviorally manipulating a pesticide-resistant insect (Lygus spp.) away from high-value horticultural crops using a push-pull strategy. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's a high honor. Doctoral candidate Emily Bick of the Christian Nansen lab, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology, is the newly announced recipient of the Entomological Society of America's 2018 student certification award, which...

A crab spider snares a Lygus bug. Emily Bick, for her doctorate, is behaviorally manipulating a pesticide-resistant insect (Lygus spp.) away from high-value horticultural crops using a push-pull strategy. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A crab spider snares a Lygus bug. Emily Bick, for her doctorate, is behaviorally manipulating a pesticide-resistant insect (Lygus spp.) away from high-value horticultural crops using a push-pull strategy. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A crab spider snares a Lygus bug. Emily Bick, for her doctorate, is behaviorally manipulating a pesticide-resistant insect (Lygus spp.) away from high-value horticultural crops using a push-pull strategy. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis Scientists Heading to Entomology Conference in Brazil

Spotted wing drosophila on a raspberry. Both Frank Zalom and Joanna Chiu of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology faculty, research collaborators, will speak on this pest. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Three faculty members from the University of California, Davis, will be among those sharing the "people" spotlight at the joint meeting of the XXVII Brazilian Congress and X Latin American Congress of Entomology --and the spotted wing drosophila...

Spotted wing drosophila on a raspberry. Both Frank Zalom and Joanna Chiu of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology faculty, research collaborators, will speak on this pest. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Spotted wing drosophila on a raspberry. Both Frank Zalom and Joanna Chiu of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology faculty, research collaborators, will speak on this pest. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Spotted wing drosophila on a raspberry. Both Frank Zalom and Joanna Chiu of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology faculty, research collaborators, will speak on this pest. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Don't Believe Everything You Read About Spiders--Or Anything Else for that Matter!

The woodlouse spider, Dysderca crocata, is neither a new species nor deadly, contrary to a Facebook hoax disguised as a public service announcement. (Photo by Michel Vuijlsteke, courtesy of Wikipedia)

Just a hoax. A fear-mongering hoax. A so-called Facebook "public service announcement" on Aug. 21 that warned of a “new deadly spider species” spreading across the United States went viral, but it was all fake news. The images that the South...

The woodlouse spider, Dysderca crocata, is neither a new species nor deadly, contrary to a Facebook hoax disguised as a public service announcement. (Photo by Michel Vuijlsteke, courtesy of Wikipedia)
The woodlouse spider, Dysderca crocata, is neither a new species nor deadly, contrary to a Facebook hoax disguised as a public service announcement. (Photo by Michel Vuijlsteke, courtesy of Wikipedia)

The woodlouse spider, Dysderca crocata, is neither a new species nor deadly, contrary to a Facebook hoax disguised as a public service announcement. (Photo by Michel Vuijlsteke, courtesy of Wikipedia)

This is a male woodlouse spider, Dysderca crocata. (Photo © Hans Hillewaert, courtesy of Wikipedia)
This is a male woodlouse spider, Dysderca crocata. (Photo © Hans Hillewaert, courtesy of Wikipedia)

This is a male woodlouse spider, Dysderca crocata. (Photo © Hans Hillewaert, courtesy of Wikipedia)

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