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Posts Tagged: drone fly

Henrietta and the Drone Fly: The Predator and the Prey

Henrietta, our Stagmomantis limbata praying mantis, lies in wait on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia.) (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Henrietta, our Stagmomantis limbata praying mantis, perches on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). She is as patient as she is persistent. The drone fly, aka syrphid and also known as a hover fly or flower fly, makes the fatal mistake of touching down on...

Henrietta, our Stagmomantis limbata praying mantis, lies in wait on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia.) (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Henrietta, our Stagmomantis limbata praying mantis, lies in wait on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia.) (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Henrietta, our Stagmomantis limbata praying mantis, lies in wait on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia.) (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A drone fly (syrphid) lands on the blossom as a hungry praying mantis watches intently. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A drone fly (syrphid) lands on the blossom as a hungry praying mantis watches intently. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A drone fly (syrphid) lands on the blossom as a hungry praying mantis watches intently. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

One quick move and praying mantis has dinner. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
One quick move and praying mantis has dinner. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

One quick move and praying mantis has dinner. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The spiked forelegs hold the prey in place. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The spiked forelegs hold the prey in place. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The spiked forelegs hold the prey in place. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's eat and be eaten in the garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
It's eat and be eaten in the garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's eat and be eaten in the garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Henrietta the praying mantis polishes off the last of the fly but a wing is visible evidence of what happened. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Henrietta the praying mantis polishes off the last of the fly but a wing is visible evidence of what happened. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Henrietta the praying mantis polishes off the last of the fly but a wing is visible evidence of what happened. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, November 8, 2018 at 5:00 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment Food Yard & Garden

A Case of Mistaken Identity

Meet the drone fly (Eristalis tenax), often mistaken for a honey bee. Note the one set of wings, large eyes, stubby antennae and a distinguishing

They can't drain your bank account. They can't open up new credit cards. They can't get medical treatment on your health insurance. But they are identity thieves, nonetheless. Meet the drone fly (Eristalis tenax), often mistaken for a honey...

Meet the drone fly (Eristalis tenax), often mistaken for a honey bee. Note the one set of wings, large eyes, stubby antennae and a distinguishing
Meet the drone fly (Eristalis tenax), often mistaken for a honey bee. Note the one set of wings, large eyes, stubby antennae and a distinguishing "H" on its abdomen. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Meet the drone fly (Eristalis tenax), often mistaken for a honey bee. Note the one set of wings, large eyes, stubby antennae and a distinguishing "H" on its abdomen. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Drone fly nectaring on Mexican sunflower, Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Drone fly nectaring on Mexican sunflower, Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Drone fly nectaring on Mexican sunflower, Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee sipping nectar from a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). (Photo by kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee sipping nectar from a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). (Photo by kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee sipping nectar from a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). (Photo by kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, October 22, 2018 at 4:53 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment Yard & Garden

Sharing the Nectar--But Not All at the Same Time

A syrphid fly (bottom right) heads toward a Mexican sunflower occupied by a honey bee. The fly, aka hover fly and flower fly, wants some nectar, too.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Everybody eats in the pollinator garden. Maybe not at the same time, but they all eat. We noticed a syrphid fly, aka flower fly/hover fly, heading toward a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia) in our pollinator garden. Alas for the fly, it was occupied....

A syrphid fly (bottom right) heads toward a Mexican sunflower occupied by a honey bee. The fly, aka hover fly and flower fly, wants some nectar, too.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A syrphid fly (bottom right) heads toward a Mexican sunflower occupied by a honey bee. The fly, aka hover fly and flower fly, wants some nectar, too.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A syrphid fly (bottom right) heads toward a Mexican sunflower occupied by a honey bee. The fly, aka hover fly and flower fly, wants some nectar, too.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Can we share? As the honey bee keeps nectaring, the syrphid comes in for a taste. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Can we share? As the honey bee keeps nectaring, the syrphid comes in for a taste. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Can we share? As the honey bee keeps nectaring, the syrphid comes in for a taste. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

All mine! The honey bee wins. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
All mine! The honey bee wins. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

All mine! The honey bee wins. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

All mine! The syprhid fly takes over. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
All mine! The syprhid fly takes over. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

All mine! The syprhid fly takes over. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

All mine! A drone fly claims it. The drone fly is often mistaken for a bee. Note the
All mine! A drone fly claims it. The drone fly is often mistaken for a bee. Note the "H" on the abdomen of the fly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

All mine! A drone fly claims it. The drone fly is often mistaken for a bee. Note the "H" on the abdomen of the fly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, October 13, 2016 at 4:36 PM
Tags: drone fly (13), Halloween (1), honey bee (5), insects (1), Mexican sunflower (4), nectar (1), syrphid fly (2), Tithonia (4)

About Those Drones,,,

A drone fly, Eristalis tenax, foraging on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Everyone's talking about the drones. You know, the unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV). Those flying robots cruising over our heads--some with cameras for journalistic and research purposes and others with "need-to-know" purposes. But in the entomological...

A drone fly, Eristalis tenax, foraging on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A drone fly, Eristalis tenax, foraging on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A drone fly, Eristalis tenax, foraging on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Note the distinguishable
Note the distinguishable "H" on the abdomen on the drone fly, Eristalis tenax. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Note the distinguishable "H" on the abdomen on the drone fly, Eristalis tenax. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of a drone fly feeding. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Close-up of a drone fly feeding. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of a drone fly feeding. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, October 14, 2015 at 7:29 PM

Drone Acrobatics

A drone fly, aka hover fly and syrphid fly, engaging in a little acrobatics  over an Iceland poppy. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The drone fly, aka European hover fly, aka syrphid fly, doesn't get as much press as the other drone, the unmanned aircraft. But the drone fly (Eristalis tenax), about the size of a honey bee and often mistaken for a honey bee, makes for great in-flight...

A drone fly, aka hover fly and syrphid fly, engaging in a little acrobatics  over an Iceland poppy. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A drone fly, aka hover fly and syrphid fly, engaging in a little acrobatics over an Iceland poppy. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A drone fly, aka hover fly and syrphid fly, engaging in a little acrobatics over an Iceland poppy. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Hover fly heading for an  Iceland poppy. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Hover fly heading for an Iceland poppy. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Hover fly heading for an Iceland poppy. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This photo shows why drone flies are pollinators. Check out the pollen. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This photo shows why drone flies are pollinators. Check out the pollen. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This photo shows why drone flies are pollinators. Check out the pollen. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, November 25, 2014 at 10:09 PM

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