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Posts Tagged: egg

California Wild Fires Raging...but Life Cycles Go On...

A Gulf Fritillary egg on the tendrils of the passionflower vine (Passiflora). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

As those horrendous wild fires continue to rage throughout California, as Cal Fire helicopters roar over, as residents scramble from their homes,  as smoke thickens the air, and as ashes flutter down like feathers, it's difficult to think about...

Posted on Wednesday, October 11, 2017 at 5:00 PM

They Didn't Get the Memo

Gulf Fritillaries are still flying--and mating and laying eggs--in November. This one is nectaring on Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

They didn't get the memo. Summer is over. Fall is underway. Winter is coming (Dec. 21). But the Gulf Fritillaries (Agraulis vanillae) are still laying eggs on the passionflower vine here in Vacaville, Calif. The eggs are hatching. The caterpillars are...

Posted on Tuesday, November 8, 2016 at 4:41 PM

The Unseen World of Gulf Fritillaries

Gulf Fritillaries mating in the passionflower vine. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Let's celebrate the Gulf Fritillary (Agraulis vanillae). If you have a passionflower vine (Passiflora) in your yard, you've probably seen these spectacular orangish-reddish butterflies with silver-spangled underwings fluttering around--the males...

Posted on Monday, August 15, 2016 at 5:08 PM

Insect Art in the Garden

The tiny yellow egg of a Gulf Fritillary glows in the early morning sun. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

If you look closely, you'll not only see the cycle of life in your garden, but art as the center of life. Take the Gulf Fritillaries. They're a stunning orangish-reddish butterfly (Agraulis vanillae) with silver-spangled underwings. It's a delight...

Posted on Wednesday, November 25, 2015 at 1:34 PM

Joy to the (Monarch) World

Female monarch has just eclosed. Next to her is a gold-studded jade-green chrysalis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Oh, the joys of rearing monarch butterflies. Not for commercial purposes. For conservation purposes. For a couple of months now, we've been watching the monarch caterpillars slowly disappearing from our milkweed plants.  We'd see fifth instar 'cats...

Posted on Friday, October 16, 2015 at 5:36 PM

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