Colusa County
University of California
Colusa County

Posts Tagged: flies

Times Flies When You're Studying Flies! Bohart Museum Open House Jan. 12

UC Davis graduate student Socrates Letana collecting flies in the Philippines. He studies botflies with major professor Lynn Kimsey.

Time flies when you're having fun? No, time's fun when you're studying flies! Take it from the fly researchers at the University of California, Davis, who will present their work at the Bohart Museum of Entomology open house from 1 to 4 p.m.,...

UC Davis graduate student Socrates Letana collecting flies in the Philippines. He studies botflies with major professor Lynn Kimsey.
UC Davis graduate student Socrates Letana collecting flies in the Philippines. He studies botflies with major professor Lynn Kimsey.

UC Davis graduate student Socrates Letana collecting flies in the Philippines. He studies botflies with major professor Lynn Kimsey.

UC Davis fourth-year doctoral student Charlotte Herbert Alberts holds her acrylic painting of an  Assassin fly (Ommatius sp.) that she painted to celebrate World Robber Fly Day, April 30.
UC Davis fourth-year doctoral student Charlotte Herbert Alberts holds her acrylic painting of an Assassin fly (Ommatius sp.) that she painted to celebrate World Robber Fly Day, April 30.

UC Davis fourth-year doctoral student Charlotte Herbert Alberts holds her acrylic painting of an Assassin fly (Ommatius sp.) that she painted to celebrate World Robber Fly Day, April 30.

A Bee Is a Bee Is a Bee...

One's a fly and one's a bee. Can you tell them apart? Honey bee on the left: syrphid fly on the right. They're nectaring on Mexican sunflower, Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Remember that line in Gertrude Stein's 1913 poem, Sacred Emily: "A rose is a rose is a rose"? Well, to paraphrase Stein: "A bee is a bee is a bee...except when it's not a bee." In a recent interactive feature in the New York Times, writer Joanna Klein...

One's a fly and one's a bee. Can you tell them apart? Honey bee on the left: syrphid fly on the right. They're nectaring on Mexican sunflower, Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
One's a fly and one's a bee. Can you tell them apart? Honey bee on the left: syrphid fly on the right. They're nectaring on Mexican sunflower, Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

One's a fly and one's a bee. Can you tell them apart? Honey bee on the left: syrphid fly on the right. They're nectaring on Mexican sunflower, Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Not a bee. This is a bee fly, genus Villa. It's nectaring on Mexican sunflower, genus Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Not a bee. This is a bee fly, genus Villa. It's nectaring on Mexican sunflower, genus Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Not a bee. This is a bee fly, genus Villa. It's nectaring on Mexican sunflower, genus Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, November 9, 2017 at 5:00 PM

Gnats on Houseplants

Fungus gnat adult caught in yellow sticky trap. (Jack Kelly Clark)

If you have house or office plants and have ever seen small, dark-colored insect swarming around them, your plants could have fungus gnats. Fungus gnats are tiny flies that as adults, resemble mosquitoes. Fungus gnats don't bite people, but their...

Posted on Monday, October 9, 2017 at 9:55 AM
Tags: flies (7), fungus gnat (2), houseplant (1), indoor (1), potting mix (1), soil (3), UC IPM (214)

An Insect You May Overlook

Sand wasp, Bembix americana, foraging on a seaside daisy on Bodega Head, Sonoma County. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

If you're walking along the cliffs of Bodega Head, Sonoma County, you may overlook them. While you're watching for whales, scouting for seabirds and checking out the hikers, there's a lot of movement in the seaside daises (Erigeron glaucus) and seaside...

Sand wasp, Bembix americana, foraging on a seaside daisy on Bodega Head, Sonoma County. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Sand wasp, Bembix americana, foraging on a seaside daisy on Bodega Head, Sonoma County. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Sand wasp, Bembix americana, foraging on a seaside daisy on Bodega Head, Sonoma County. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Side view of sand wasp, Sand wasp, Bembix americana, foraging on a seaside daisy on Bodega Head, Sonoma County. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Side view of sand wasp, Sand wasp, Bembix americana, foraging on a seaside daisy on Bodega Head, Sonoma County. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Side view of sand wasp, Sand wasp, Bembix americana, foraging on a seaside daisy on Bodega Head, Sonoma County. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Sand wasp foraging for food on the seaside woolly sunflower, also nicknamed lizard tail and seaside golden yarrow. Its botanical name is Eriophyllum staechadifolium. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Sand wasp foraging for food on the seaside woolly sunflower, also nicknamed lizard tail and seaside golden yarrow. Its botanical name is Eriophyllum staechadifolium. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Sand wasp foraging for food on the seaside woolly sunflower, also nicknamed lizard tail and seaside golden yarrow. Its botanical name is Eriophyllum staechadifolium. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Flies are Pollinators!

Adult syrphid fly [J.K.Clark]

Will all the pollinators please stand up! Or do a fly-by like the Blue Angels or a crawl-by like babies competing in a diaper derby. Bees--there are more than 4000 of them in North America--are the main pollinators, but don't overlook butterflies,...

Posted on Thursday, October 8, 2015 at 1:39 PM
  • Author: Kathy Keatley Garvey
Tags: bees (42), flies (7), Kathy Garvey (1), pollinators (32), syrphid fly (19), UCIPM (66)

Next 5 stories | Last story

 
E-mail
 
Webmaster Email: colusa@ucanr.edu