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Posts Tagged: honey bees

How We Can Help the Bees Through Research

A honey bee heads toward mustard. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

How can we help honey bees through research? That's the topic that Francis Ratnieks, professor of apiculture, University of Sussex, United Kingdom, will cover when he presents a seminar on Wednesday, Dec. 7 at the University of California, Davis. He'll...

Posted on Friday, December 2, 2016 at 1:21 PM

Count Your Blessings--and Thank the Bees!

Honey bee heading toward pomegranate blossom on an 87-year-old tree. Pomegranates are among the 100 crops--from almonds to watermelon--pollinated by bees. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's Thanksgiving. Count your blessings--and thank the bees. If your table includes pumpkin, cranberries, carrots, cucumbers, onions, apples, oranges, cherries, blueberries, grapefruit, persimmons, pomegranates, pears, sunflower seeds, and almonds,...

Posted on Thursday, November 24, 2016 at 9:23 AM

Let's Hear It for the Bees and Beekeepers

Two matched pairs of honey bees on a blanket flower, Gaillardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Let's hear it for the honey bees. Right now they're scrambling to gather nectar and pollen from the blanket flower, Gaillardia. You could say they're blanketing the flower. When resources are scarce in the fall,  the blanket flower, in the...

Posted on Monday, November 14, 2016 at 6:49 PM

How the Bees Helped Save America

Honey bees, shown here modern day, played a role in the Revolutionary War. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Today, on Veterans' Day, we pay tribute to our military veterans and those serving in our U.S. Armed Forces. It's appropriate to think of America's first veterans from 261 years ago--the patriots who fought in the American Revolutionary War, also known...

Posted on Friday, November 11, 2016 at 2:12 PM

Do You Know Me?

A drone fly, Eristalis tenax, sips nectar from a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The drone fly is an identity thief. It's often mistaken for a honey bee. Hey, isn't every floral visitor a bee? No, not by a long shot. One's a fly and one's a bee. That came to mind last weekend when we saw a large  number of honey bees (Apis...

Posted on Friday, October 28, 2016 at 5:00 PM

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