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Posts Tagged: praying mantis

Henrietta and the Drone Fly: The Predator and the Prey

Henrietta, our Stagmomantis limbata praying mantis, lies in wait on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia.) (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Henrietta, our Stagmomantis limbata praying mantis, perches on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). She is as patient as she is persistent. The drone fly, aka syrphid and also known as a hover fly or flower fly, makes the fatal mistake of touching down on...

Henrietta, our Stagmomantis limbata praying mantis, lies in wait on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia.) (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Henrietta, our Stagmomantis limbata praying mantis, lies in wait on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia.) (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Henrietta, our Stagmomantis limbata praying mantis, lies in wait on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia.) (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A drone fly (syrphid) lands on the blossom as a hungry praying mantis watches intently. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A drone fly (syrphid) lands on the blossom as a hungry praying mantis watches intently. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A drone fly (syrphid) lands on the blossom as a hungry praying mantis watches intently. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

One quick move and praying mantis has dinner. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
One quick move and praying mantis has dinner. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

One quick move and praying mantis has dinner. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The spiked forelegs hold the prey in place. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The spiked forelegs hold the prey in place. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The spiked forelegs hold the prey in place. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's eat and be eaten in the garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
It's eat and be eaten in the garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's eat and be eaten in the garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Henrietta the praying mantis polishes off the last of the fly but a wing is visible evidence of what happened. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Henrietta the praying mantis polishes off the last of the fly but a wing is visible evidence of what happened. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Henrietta the praying mantis polishes off the last of the fly but a wing is visible evidence of what happened. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, November 8, 2018 at 5:00 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment Food Yard & Garden

Henrietta and the Ootheca

Henrietta, a Stagmomantis limbata, hanging out in a patch of Mexican sunflowers. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Talk about the unexpected. “Look!” says Jim. He pauses by the kitchen counter. "Over there!” he says, pointing. I don't see anything except the half-filled coffee pot. Then I see it. "There," as in “over there,” is a...

Henrietta, a Stagmomantis limbata, hanging out in a patch of Mexican sunflowers. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Henrietta, a Stagmomantis limbata, hanging out in a patch of Mexican sunflowers. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Henrietta, a Stagmomantis limbata, hanging out in a patch of Mexican sunflowers. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This is the ootheca that Henrietta (which means
This is the ootheca that Henrietta (which means "home ruler") deposited before we released her. The species? Stagmomantis limbata. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This is the ootheca that Henrietta (which means "home ruler") deposited before we released her. The species? Stagmomantis limbata. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of the ootheca, magnified with a Leica DVM6 microscope operated by Lynn Epstein, UC Davis emeritus professor of plant pathology.
Close-up of the ootheca, magnified with a Leica DVM6 microscope operated by Lynn Epstein, UC Davis emeritus professor of plant pathology.

Close-up of the ootheca, magnified with a Leica DVM6 microscope operated by Lynn Epstein, UC Davis emeritus professor of plant pathology.

Posted on Wednesday, November 7, 2018 at 9:00 AM
Focus Area Tags: Environment

Ooh, an Ootheca!

Ms. Mantis, on a redwood stake in a milkweed planter in Vacaville, Calif., is trying to find a place to lay her egg mass, an ootheca. This image was taken Sunday night, Sept. 23. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Hide and seek. She hides 'em and we seek 'em. We've spotted as many as seven adult praying mantids at a time in our little pollinator garden in Vacaville, Calif. but never once have we seen any of them laying eggs. Until now. We know that a praying...

Ms. Mantis, on a redwood stake in a milkweed planter in Vacaville, Calif., is trying to find a place to lay her egg mass, an ootheca. This image was taken Sunday night, Sept. 23. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Ms. Mantis, on a redwood stake in a milkweed planter in Vacaville, Calif., is trying to find a place to lay her egg mass, an ootheca. This image was taken Sunday night, Sept. 23. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ms. Mantis, on a redwood stake in a milkweed planter in Vacaville, Calif., is trying to find a place to lay her egg mass, an ootheca. This image was taken Sunday night, Sept. 23. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This looks like a good spot. This praying mantis, Stagmomantis limbata, is native to North America. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This looks like a good spot. This praying mantis, Stagmomantis limbata, is native to North America. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This looks like a good spot. This praying mantis, Stagmomantis limbata, is native to North America. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ms. Mantis begins to work. Note the frothy cream-colored substance. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Ms. Mantis begins to work. Note the frothy cream-colored substance. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ms. Mantis begins to work. Note the frothy cream-colored substance. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of the process. This Stagmomantis limbata did so in the open. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Close-up of the process. This Stagmomantis limbata did so in the open. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of the process. This Stagmomantis limbata did so in the open. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

At dawn the next morning, we found her still on the stake with her hardening ootheca. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
At dawn the next morning, we found her still on the stake with her hardening ootheca. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

At dawn the next morning, we found her still on the stake with her hardening ootheca. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, October 1, 2018 at 4:59 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment Natural Resources

A Crafty Time at the Bohart Museum of Entomology

This quilted wall hanging of dragonflies is the work of quiltmaker and seamstress Ann Babicky of Schofield, Wis. Entomologist Jeff Smith, who curates the butterfly and moth specimens in the Bohart, loaned it for the open house. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Five quilted dragonflies skimming the wall. Eager hands cradling an orchid mantis. Eyes darting toward a hornet's nest. That set the scene at the UC Davis Bohart Museum of Entomology's three-hour open house, themed "Crafty Insects."  Visitors...

This quilted wall hanging of dragonflies is the work of quiltmaker and seamstress Ann Babicky of Schofield, Wis. Entomologist Jeff Smith, who curates the butterfly and moth specimens in the Bohart, loaned it for the open house. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This quilted wall hanging of dragonflies is the work of quiltmaker and seamstress Ann Babicky of Schofield, Wis. Entomologist Jeff Smith, who curates the butterfly and moth specimens in the Bohart, loaned it for the open house. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This quilted wall hanging of dragonflies is the work of quiltmaker and seamstress Ann Babicky of Schofield, Wis. Entomologist Jeff Smith, who curates the butterfly and moth specimens in the Bohart, loaned it for the open house. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Hands cradle an orchid mantis, orchid mantis, Hymenopus coronatus, from the collection of Lohit Garikipati. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Hands cradle an orchid mantis, orchid mantis, Hymenopus coronatus, from the collection of Lohit Garikipati. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Hands cradle an orchid mantis, orchid mantis, Hymenopus coronatus, from the collection of Lohit Garikipati. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Entomologist Jeff Smith, curator of the butterfly and moth specimens at the Bohart, shows a tray to sisters Lily Edmonds of Davis, 7, and Chloe Edmonds, 6, of Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Entomologist Jeff Smith, curator of the butterfly and moth specimens at the Bohart, shows a tray to sisters Lily Edmonds of Davis, 7, and Chloe Edmonds, 6, of Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Entomologist Jeff Smith, curator of the butterfly and moth specimens at the Bohart, shows a tray to sisters Lily Edmonds of Davis, 7, and Chloe Edmonds, 6, of Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Lily Edmonds of Davis, 7, reacts to the colorful butterflies. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Lily Edmonds of Davis, 7, reacts to the colorful butterflies. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Lily Edmonds of Davis, 7, reacts to the colorful butterflies. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bohart associate and UC Davis student Emma Cluff (back) talks about a hornet's nest. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Bohart associate and UC Davis student Emma Cluff (back) talks about a hornet's nest. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bohart associate and UC Davis student Emma Cluff (back) talks about a hornet's nest. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Visitors learned about the fascinating world of insects. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Visitors learned about the fascinating world of insects. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Visitors learned about the fascinating world of insects. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)


"Places where we've collected" drew the attention of these Bohart guests. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

"Places where we've collected" drew the attention of these Bohart guests. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, September 26, 2018 at 2:57 PM

Meet Some Crafty Insects at Bohart Museum of Entomology

A praying mantis dining on a cabbage white butterfly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Talk about "crafty"--as in cunning or sneaky--insects. Ever seen a praying mantis ambushing a cabbage white butterfly? Or an assassin bug targeting a spotted cucumber beetle? Or European paper wasps attacking a Gulf Fritillary butterfly? And, how...

A praying mantis dining on a cabbage white butterfly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A praying mantis dining on a cabbage white butterfly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A praying mantis dining on a cabbage white butterfly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

An assassin bug targeting prey: a spotted cucumber beetle. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
An assassin bug targeting prey: a spotted cucumber beetle. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

An assassin bug targeting prey: a spotted cucumber beetle. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

European paper wasps attacking a newly eclosed Gulf Fritillary butterfly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
European paper wasps attacking a newly eclosed Gulf Fritillary butterfly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

European paper wasps attacking a newly eclosed Gulf Fritillary butterfly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

These
These "crafty" European paper wasps are making their nest. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

These "crafty" European paper wasps are making their nest. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A feral honey bee colony is a work of art. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A feral honey bee colony is a work of art. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A feral honey bee colony is a work of art. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, September 17, 2018 at 4:41 PM

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