Colusa County
University of California
Colusa County

Master Gardeners

 

 Science based solutions for Colusa County's gardening communities.

The UCCE Master Gardeners of Colusa County volunteer's donated 667 hours and made 1400 face to face contacts in 2016/17.

Since 2009, we have volunteered 5,000 hours and made 10,000 face to face contacts in Colusa County.

 

This is what we do!

Click here for a short video!

 

Garden Chat

We are starting something new! If this works, then we will expand it to other areas!

Garden Chat

Calling all garden lovers! Garden Chat is a roundtable chat about gardening. It's a place to share your gardening stories, successes, challenges and learn from your neighbors. See what happens when you unplug, slow down and enjoy!

Garden Chat is open to the public.

When: June 26, 1-2 pm

Where: Arbuckle Library, 610 King St., Arbuckle

Garden Chat June

June in the Garden

  • In the flower garden you can still plant seeds of marigolds, zinnias, cosmos and sunflowers. You can set out transplants of perennials like yarrow, verbena, black-eyed Susan, and dahlias.
  • In the vegetable garden you can plant seeds of pumpkins, squash, and corn.
  • Be sure to water early in the day to conserve water and minimize plant disease. Regularly check your sprinklers and drip emitters for needed repairs and adjustments. Monitor soil moisture in hot weather to be sure you are irrigating enough. (Use a metal rod to push into the ground. If it goes in easily, the soil is moist.)
  • Fertilize summer blooming flowers early in the month. Later in the month use a fertilizer for acid-loving plants like azaleas and camellias. Always follow the directions for proper dilution of concentrates.
  • Dig and divide spring-flowering bulbs when the tops have died down.
  • Before the full heat of summer arrives mulch your beds to control weeds and conserve moisture.

Water Trees First

TRIC lawn

Our trees are the most important garden asset. They provide shade, clean the air, provide habitat for wildlife, they are beautiful and increase your property value.

A new way of irrigating trees have been developed by the University of California. As you see in the picture you will circle the tree with a drip line or soaker hose to the edge of the canopy. You can purchase supplies at your local garden center or hardware store.

To get the deep watering need for trees, you will need to run the drip line for several hours but only irrigate every 2-4 weeks. The water needs to penetrate the soil about 2-3 feed deep.

For more information from the California Center for Urban Horticulture, click here.

 

Water-wise tips

 

CONSERVE WATER

Create drought resistant soil

  1. By incorporating 2-4 inches of compost into the soil you will increase the water holding capacity of the soil.
  2. Topdressing compost around plants will reduce water needs but not up to the plant base.       Space @ the base.
  3. Mulch all exposed soil to reduce evaporation with bark, leaf litter or rocks
    Mulch

Benefit:

  • Reduced water usage

 

Grow California or Mediterranean natives

Check out the UC Arboretum All-Stars

  1. Plants thrive with little irrigation
  2. Planting in the fall allows the roots to grow without competition
  3. Irrigate until established
  4. Minimize high water use ornamentals

Benefit:

Cal Iris

  • Reduce watering
  • Reduce trimming
  • Reduce fertilizing
  • Reduce spraying

 

Minimize the Lawn

  1. The use of native groundcovers, grasses, shrubs and trees make an eye catching garden
  2. Reduce the size of the lawn and plant Tall fescue. It is a cool season grass that does well in summer. Most cool season grasses need a lot of water to look good
  3. Avoid slopes, plant a ground cover instead of lawn

Benefit:

Min lawn

  • Conserve water
  • Conserve energy
  • Conserve labor        

  

Hydrozoning

  1. By grouping plants together by water and light needs plants tend to be healthy
  2. When you group your plants together by water and light needs then you can properly water each micro-climate
  3. Use California natives

Benefit:

  • Healthy plants
  • Conserve water
  • Less pruning

 

Irrigation System

  1. Remember to change your irrigation timer seasonally. Monthly adjustments are encouraged
  2. Use an automatic controller on your irrigation system
  3. Use drip for your flower and shrub beds
  4. Replace old sprinkler heads with high efficient ones. If your system is over 10 years old check out the new sprinkler heads at your local garden center
  5. Use multiple run times if you have a lot of run-off before the timer shuts off.  For example; you should irrigate every other day for 20 minutes but after 15 minutes the water is running off the lawn. Instead run the system for 10 minutes, wait 1 hour and run for another 10 minutes. This works especially well on slopes.

Benefit:

  • Limit evaporation and run-off
  • Limit disease
  • Limit weeds

 

Irrigate according to the season

  1. Know your watering needs
  2. Adjust watering to the season, use chart in Lawn Watering brochure
  3. Water early
  4. Water slowly
  5. Water deeply

Benefit:

  • Appropriate watering slows plant growth
  • Promotes plant health
  • Reduces pruning and mowing
  • It is estimated that overwatering causes 85% of all landscape problems

 

Make every Drop Count                 

  1. Water wisely and slowly.
  2. Mulch is one of the quickest, easiest and most cost-effective ways to save water
  3. Repair leaks and broken sprinklers
  4. Reduce overspray areas
  5. Adjust the system frequently to the season
  6. Mulching exposed soil reduces evaporation.
  7. Prevent urban drool

Benefit:

  • Conserve water
  • Save money
  • Urban landscape water use can be reduced by 50%

 

Help your trees survive the drought

More information:

8 Smart Gardening Practices

How to save water in your garden

Keep Plantings Alive under Drought Conditions

Lawn Watering Guide for California

Lawn Watering

Rules of Thumb for Water Wise Landscape

Water Conservation checklist

Water Conservation Tips

 

Websites

California Garden Web

UC Guide to Healthy Lawns

River Friendly Landscaping

UC Davis Arboretum

UC Master Gardeners of Sacramento County

UC Master Gardeners of San Joaquin County

 

 

Asian Citrus Psyllid

Asian Citrus Psyllid is an insect that carries a devastating disease in Citrus trees and there is no cure. The insect and disease is usually detected in home citrus first. Click here to read more about the Asian Citrus Psyllid and the Huanglongbing disease.

The Asian Citrus Psyllid has been found in San Joaquin County.

Click here to read about the Asian Citrus Psyllid from the UCCE Master Gardeners of San Joaquin County.

Click here for Spanish

 

UC Master Gardeners of Colusa County

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The University of California Master Gardener Program provides the public with UC research-based information about home horticulture, sustainable landscape and pest management practices. The program is administered by local University of California Cooperative Extension (UCCE) county offices that are the principal outreach and public service arms of the University’s division of Agriculture and Natural Resources.

The UC Master Gardener program supports sustainable gardening practices that protect the environment, conserve natural resources, and take into consideration each gardener's lifestyle and goals.

 

What do UC Master Gardeners do?

UC Master Gardeners are trained to help residents of California become better gardeners. Using a variety of activities such as workshops, lectures, and garden hotlines these volunteers answer questions about home horticulture, sustainable landscaping, and integrated pest management using University of California research-based information.

After their training UC Master Gardeners are qualified to help the public with problems in areas such as:

  • Weed Control
  • Plant Problem Diagnosis
  • Integrated Pest Management (insect and pest control)
  • Soils, fertilizers and irrigation
  • Selecting and caring for fruit and landscape trees
  • Growing annuals, perennials and food crops
  • Lawn care
  • Vegetable Gardening
  • Plant Pathology
  • Composting

 

Each county develops programs to address local needs. Some typical activities are:

  • Using mass media to disseminate gardening information
  • Teaching workshops, or lecturing on gardening practices
  • Participating in research activities with academics within UC
  • Answering gardeners’ questions via email or helplines
  • Speaking to the public on horticultural and gardening topics
  • Manning county fair information booths
  • Consulting with gardeners to improve their landscape practices

 

Make an Online Gift to UC Master Gardeners

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Calendar

Event Name
Date

Garden Advice and Workshops


Colusa County Fair

June 7-10

Etchepare Hall

Colusa, Ca

 


 

Master Gardener Blog

Invasive Spotlight: Japanese Dodder

Spaghettilike stems of Japanese dodder growing on a tree. (Credit: Vince Guise)

When people think of parasites, often what comes to mind are blood-sucking insects like bed bugs, head lice, and fleas or other bodily invaders on or in humans and other animals. But plants can have parasites too. Most of us are familiar with mistletoe...

Posted on Wednesday, June 6, 2018 at 10:00 PM
Tags: California (20), dodder (1), invasive (24), Japanese (3), mistletoe (2), parasitic plant (2), pest management (5), Pest Notes (52), UC IPM (170)
Focus Area Tags: Pest Management Yard & Garden

This BOG in the Heart of UC Davis Is a Treasure

The Biological Orchard and Gardens (BOG) sign features floral and insect designs. It's located by the Mann Laboratory, UC Davis campus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

"A bog is a wetland that accumulates peat, a deposit of dead plant material—often mosses, and in a majority of cases, sphagnum moss."--Wikipedia. Not so with the Biological Orchard and Gardens (BOG) on the University of California, Davis, campus....

Invasive Spotlight: Invasive Plants

The flowers of French broom are attractive, but this invasive plant is not a good choice for landscapes. (Credit: Jack Kelly Clark)

People in urban and suburban areas often use the term “invasive” to describe plants or weeds that appear to take over a garden or landscape. However, true invasive plants are weeds that infest ecosystems, rangelands, and pasture—places...

Posted on Tuesday, June 5, 2018 at 10:00 PM
Webmaster Email: colusa@ucanr.edu