Colusa County
University of California
Colusa County

Master Gardeners

 

 Science based solutions for Colusa County's gardening communities.

The UCCE Master Gardeners of Colusa County volunteer's donated 667 hours and made 1400 face to face contacts in 2016/17.

Since 2009, we have volunteered 5,000 hours and made 10,000 face to face contacts in Colusa County.

 

This is what we do!

Click here for a short video!

 

Make an Online Gift to UC Master Gardeners

August in the Garden

¨ You can plant directly in the garden seeds of carrots, beets, lettuce, spinach and turnips. Indoors you can start seeds for broccoli, cabbage, kale, bunching onions, and radicchio.

¨ Be sure to monitor your watering system. Check for coverage and watch for plugged or blocked sprinklers.

¨ Continue to weed. Be especially sure to get weeds before they flower and set seeds.

¨ Check the mulch you have spread around and be sure it is thick enough to suppress weeds.  (3 to 4 inches)

¨ Cut off spent flowers of perennials and annuals for continued bloom.

Asian Citrus Psyllid

Asian Citrus Psyllid is an insect that carries a devastating disease in Citrus trees and there is no cure. The insect and disease is usually detected in home citrus first. Click here to read more about the Asian Citrus Psyllid and the Huanglongbing disease.

The Asian Citrus Psyllid has been found in San Joaquin County.

Click here to read about the Asian Citrus Psyllid from the UCCE Master Gardeners of San Joaquin County.

Click here for Spanish

 

UC Master Gardeners of Colusa County

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The University of California Master Gardener Program provides the public with UC research-based information about home horticulture, sustainable landscape and pest management practices. The program is administered by local University of California Cooperative Extension (UCCE) county offices that are the principal outreach and public service arms of the University’s division of Agriculture and Natural Resources.

The UC Master Gardener program supports sustainable gardening practices that protect the environment, conserve natural resources, and take into consideration each gardener's lifestyle and goals.

 

What do UC Master Gardeners do?

UC Master Gardeners are trained to help residents of California become better gardeners. Using a variety of activities such as workshops, lectures, and garden hotlines these volunteers answer questions about home horticulture, sustainable landscaping, and integrated pest management using University of California research-based information.

After their training UC Master Gardeners are qualified to help the public with problems in areas such as:

  • Weed Control
  • Plant Problem Diagnosis
  • Integrated Pest Management (insect and pest control)
  • Soils, fertilizers and irrigation
  • Selecting and caring for fruit and landscape trees
  • Growing annuals, perennials and food crops
  • Lawn care
  • Vegetable Gardening
  • Plant Pathology
  • Composting

 

Each county develops programs to address local needs. Some typical activities are:

  • Using mass media to disseminate gardening information
  • Teaching workshops, or lecturing on gardening practices
  • Participating in research activities with academics within UC
  • Answering gardeners’ questions via email or helplines
  • Speaking to the public on horticultural and gardening topics
  • Manning county fair information booths
  • Consulting with gardeners to improve their landscape practices

 

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Garden Advice and Workshops


Watch for more workshops coming in September!


 

 

Featured Plant

Fescue

California fescue

Perennial

Medium size

California native

Fescue

 

 

Master Gardener Blog

A Honey of a Day--And It Gets Better!

Extension apiculturist Elina Lastro Niño shows a frame to her class at the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Saturday, Aug. 19 promises to be a honey of a day--in more ways than one! And it gets better! It's National Honey Bee Day or National Honey Bee Awareness Day, launched in 2009 by newly appointed U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Thomas Vilsak during his...

It's National Honey Bee Day! (August 19th)

monitoring captioned

Posted on Friday, August 18, 2017 at 10:51 AM
Tags: apiculture (3), colonies (1), damage (6), honey bees (297), Nino (1), Parreira (1), pests (41), UC IPM (100), varroa mite (13)

Keep an Eye out for Powdery Mildew

Powdery mildew on rose. (Jack Kelly Clark)

This time of year, you may notice a white, powdery looking growth on fruit, vegetable plants or ornamental plants in your garden. What is it? It could be powdery mildew. Powdery mildew is caused by several different fungi that may attack plant leaf...

Posted on Friday, August 18, 2017 at 10:25 AM
Tags: disease (15), fruit (3), fungus (3), ornamental (1), plants (7), powdery mildew (2), UC IPM (100), vegetable (1)
Webmaster Email: colusa@ucanr.edu