Colusa County
University of California
Colusa County

Master Gardeners

 

 Science based solutions for Colusa County's gardening communities.

The UCCE Master Gardeners of Colusa County volunteer's donated 802 hours and made 1458 face to face contacts in 2014/15.

 

This is what we do!

Click here for a short video!

 

April in the Garden

What to plant?

  • In a shady spot early in the month you can still plant pansies, violas, and primroses.
  • You can plant dahlia tubers and transplant most perennials.
  • As temperatures warm (nights consistently over 55 degrees) you can transplant tomatoes, eggplants and peppers.
  • You can still plant seeds of cilantro, radishes, beets and chard. (Cilantro will go to seed quickly as the weather warms up.)

Chores:

  • Fertilize shrubs and trees once this spring.
  • Watch azaleas and camellias for yellowing between the veins in the leaves. If the leaf is yellowish, apply chelated iron to the plants.
  • Trim the dead flowers but not the leaves from spring bulbs. The leaves restore the bulb; so wait to remove them until they turn yellow. Fertilize the bulbs after the bloom is finished with bone meal.
  • Apply organic mulch to all beds to keep the soil cool and enrich the soil.

Asian Citrus Psyllid

Asian Citrus Psyllid is an insect that carries a devastating disease in Citrus trees and there is no cure. The insect and disease is usually detected in home citrus first. Click here to read more about the Asian Citrus Psyllid and the Huanglongbing disease.

The Asian Citrus Psyllid has been found in San Joaquin County.

Click here to read about the Asian Citrus Psyllid from the UCCE Master Gardeners of San Joaquin County.

Click here for Spanish

 

UC Master Gardeners of Colusa County

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The University of California Master Gardener Program provides the public with UC research-based information about home horticulture, sustainable landscape and pest management practices. The program is administered by local University of California Cooperative Extension (UCCE) county offices that are the principal outreach and public service arms of the University’s division of Agriculture and Natural Resources.

The UC Master Gardener program supports sustainable gardening practices that protect the environment, conserve natural resources, and take into consideration each gardener's lifestyle and goals.

 

What do UC Master Gardeners do?

UC Master Gardeners are trained to help residents of California become better gardeners. Using a variety of activities such as workshops, lectures, and garden hotlines these volunteers answer questions about home horticulture, sustainable landscaping, and integrated pest management using University of California research-based information.

After their training UC Master Gardeners are qualified to help the public with problems in areas such as:

  • Weed Control
  • Plant Problem Diagnosis
  • Integrated Pest Management (insect and pest control)
  • Soils, fertilizers and irrigation
  • Selecting and caring for fruit and landscape trees
  • Growing annuals, perennials and food crops
  • Lawn care
  • Vegetable Gardening
  • Plant Pathology
  • Composting

 

Each county develops programs to address local needs. Some typical activities are:

  • Using mass media to disseminate gardening information
  • Teaching workshops, or lecturing on gardening practices
  • Participating in research activities with academics within UC
  • Answering gardeners’ questions via email or helplines
  • Speaking to the public on horticultural and gardening topics
  • Manning county fair information booths
  • Consulting with gardeners to improve their landscape practices

 

Find us on Facebook

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Garden Advice and Workshops

 

Nature Photography with your Smart Phone, April 23, 10-noon, Williams

 

Gourd workshop, May 14, 9-12, Colusa County Fairgrounds, Community building

 

 

Featured Plant

Fescue

California fescue

Perennial

Medium size

California native

Fescue

 

 

Master Gardener Blog

This 'B' Gets an 'A' for Good Grooming

A honey bee lands on the edge of a planter and proceeds to clean her tongue (proboscis). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This "B" gets an "A" for good grooming. We recently watched a honey bee land on the edge of a planter. "Hmm," we thought. "Why is she landing there? She should be foraging on the flowers in the pollinator garden." We soon found out. After positioning...

Posted on Friday, April 29, 2016 at 5:39 PM
Tags: Apis mellifera (13), grooming (1), Honey bee (169), proboscis (2), tongue (2)

Help Slow the Spread of Asian Citrus Psyllid in California

Figure 1. Highly magnified adult Asian citrus psyllid feeding on citrus. [B. Grafton-Cardwell]

[From the March 2016 issue of UC IPM's Retail Nursery & Garden Center IPM News] Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) continues to spread and to be an ever-present concern in California. Because of this, we have updated information from the April 2015 issue of...

Posted on Friday, April 29, 2016 at 1:33 PM
Tags: ACP (11), asian citrus psyllid (17), Daugherty (2), Grafton-Cardwell (4), HLB (9), huanglongbing (11), retail nursery (3), UC IPM (46), Wilen (4)

Stop and Smell the Roses at UC Davis Rose Weekend

A yellow rose,

Back in 2013 we purchased a stunning yellow rose, "Sparkle and Shine," at the UC Davis Rose Weekend. Well, it was a natural thing to do--a honey bee was on it! Honey bees aren't all that attracted to commercial roses, but this one was. Honey bees are...

Posted on Thursday, April 28, 2016 at 5:18 PM
Webmaster Email: colusa@ucanr.edu