Colusa County
University of California
Colusa County

Master Gardeners

 

 Science based solutions for Colusa County's gardening communities.

The UCCE Master Gardeners of Colusa County volunteer's donated 667 hours and made 1400 face to face contacts in 2016/17.

Since 2009, we have volunteered 5,000 hours and made 10,000 face to face contacts in Colusa County.

 

This is what we do!

Click here for a short video!

 

Make an Online Gift to UC Master Gardeners

July in the Garden

  • You can still plant seeds of annuals: zinnias, marigolds, sunflowers and alyssum will grow and bloom this year.
  • Be sure everything is well mulched for the heat of summer. Water before 10 am to avoid fungal infections and to minimize water loss to evaporation.
  • If you have blackberries in your garden, cut the canes that bore fruit to the ground. Tie up 3-5 of the new canes and fertilize to promote new growth.
  • Cut canna stems to the ground as they finish flowering to encourage new stems to grow.
  • Dig and divide bearded iris that have not been divided for 3 yrs. Cut the foliage on the divisions to 6-8 inches, replanting only new rhizomes and discarding the old rhizomes.
  • You can dig and divide other bulbs after the foliage has died off.
  • Deadhead blooming plants as they finish flowering to promote continuing bloom. Fertilize roses after each burst of blooms.
  • Cut back lavender after flowering to promote a second bloom. You can prune by half to keep the plant in bounds.
  • If you have fruit trees, be sure to pick up dropped fruit to prevent brown rot from developing and leaving spores for future infection.

Asian Citrus Psyllid

Asian Citrus Psyllid is an insect that carries a devastating disease in Citrus trees and there is no cure. The insect and disease is usually detected in home citrus first. Click here to read more about the Asian Citrus Psyllid and the Huanglongbing disease.

The Asian Citrus Psyllid has been found in San Joaquin County.

Click here to read about the Asian Citrus Psyllid from the UCCE Master Gardeners of San Joaquin County.

Click here for Spanish

 

UC Master Gardeners of Colusa County

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The University of California Master Gardener Program provides the public with UC research-based information about home horticulture, sustainable landscape and pest management practices. The program is administered by local University of California Cooperative Extension (UCCE) county offices that are the principal outreach and public service arms of the University’s division of Agriculture and Natural Resources.

The UC Master Gardener program supports sustainable gardening practices that protect the environment, conserve natural resources, and take into consideration each gardener's lifestyle and goals.

 

What do UC Master Gardeners do?

UC Master Gardeners are trained to help residents of California become better gardeners. Using a variety of activities such as workshops, lectures, and garden hotlines these volunteers answer questions about home horticulture, sustainable landscaping, and integrated pest management using University of California research-based information.

After their training UC Master Gardeners are qualified to help the public with problems in areas such as:

  • Weed Control
  • Plant Problem Diagnosis
  • Integrated Pest Management (insect and pest control)
  • Soils, fertilizers and irrigation
  • Selecting and caring for fruit and landscape trees
  • Growing annuals, perennials and food crops
  • Lawn care
  • Vegetable Gardening
  • Plant Pathology
  • Composting

 

Each county develops programs to address local needs. Some typical activities are:

  • Using mass media to disseminate gardening information
  • Teaching workshops, or lecturing on gardening practices
  • Participating in research activities with academics within UC
  • Answering gardeners’ questions via email or helplines
  • Speaking to the public on horticultural and gardening topics
  • Manning county fair information booths
  • Consulting with gardeners to improve their landscape practices

 

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Garden Advice and Workshops


Watch for more workshops coming in September!


 

 

Featured Plant

Fescue

California fescue

Perennial

Medium size

California native

Fescue

 

 

Master Gardener Blog

Moths, Microscopes and Insect Scientists: They All Go Together at Bohart Museum Open House

Moth Night at the Bohart Museum is fun and educational. Here two youngsters learn the differences between moths and butterflies at last year's event. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Moths, a magnificent microscope (scanning electron microscope) and friendly scientists--what could be better than that? How about free hot chocolate, herbal tea and cookies? The Bohart Museum of Entomology open house on Saturday night, July 22, promises...

Posted on Friday, July 21, 2017 at 5:43 PM

Not a Good Way to Welcome an Admiral

A territorial male long-horned bee, probably Melissodes agilis, targets a Red Admiral, Vanessa atalanta. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It was not a good way to welcome an admiral. The Red Admiral butterfly, that is. The Vanessa atalanta fluttered into our pollinator garden on Sunday, July 16 in Vacaville, Calif., and touched down on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). The warmth of...

Posted on Thursday, July 20, 2017 at 5:35 PM

Bruce's Big Battle at Briggs: 15 Minutes of Aim!

Distinguished professor Bruce Hammock, who holds a joint appointment with the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology and the UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, gets drenched. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

What do professors do for fun and camaraderie? Bruce Hammock, distinguished professor at the University of California, Davis, who holds a joint appointment with the Department of Entomology and Nematology and the UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center,...

Posted on Wednesday, July 19, 2017 at 6:35 PM
Webmaster Email: colusa@ucanr.edu