Colusa County
University of California
Colusa County

Master Gardeners

Become a Certified UCCE Master Gardener

What could be more fun and gratifying than mastering the art and science of gardening with friends and other garden enthusiast? You may have been born with a green thumb or, more likely, were self taught or learned gardening techniques from an experienced gardener. But if you feel limited in knowledge and experience, perhaps it's time to become a skilled home gardener through a proven training program like that of the UCCE Master Gardeners. All you need is a love of learning, an eagerness to participate in a training program, and the willingness to share your knowledge with the community. If this sounds fun to you, this year may be the year to become a UCCE Master Gardener of Colusa County.

This year's training will be in Willows from 6 to 9pm.

2018 Complete Application

 

 Science based solutions for Colusa County's gardening communities.

The UCCE Master Gardeners of Colusa County volunteer's donated 667 hours and made 1400 face to face contacts in 2016/17.

Since 2009, we have volunteered 5,000 hours and made 10,000 face to face contacts in Colusa County.

 

This is what we do!

Click here for a short video!

 

Make an Online Gift to UC Master Gardeners

September in the Garden

What to plant:

  • Cool-Weather annuals like pansies, violas, snapdragons can be transplanted now.
  • Also, transplants of broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, and kale can be planted this month.
  • Direct seed peas, spinach, radishes, lettuce, and carrots.

 

September Chores:

  • September is a good time to consider reducing the size of your lawn. It is also a good time to rejuvenate a lawn with over-seeding.
  • Put your spent annual and vegetables (disease-free, of course) in your compost pile.
  • Add compost to the beds that had the annuals and vegetables you are pulling out, before re-planting in those beds.

 

This is also the month to divide, and re-plant overgrown perennials that have finished blooming. Be sure to clear out any weeds that developed in the perennial bed.

Asian Citrus Psyllid

Asian Citrus Psyllid is an insect that carries a devastating disease in Citrus trees and there is no cure. The insect and disease is usually detected in home citrus first. Click here to read more about the Asian Citrus Psyllid and the Huanglongbing disease.

The Asian Citrus Psyllid has been found in San Joaquin County.

Click here to read about the Asian Citrus Psyllid from the UCCE Master Gardeners of San Joaquin County.

Click here for Spanish

 

UC Master Gardeners of Colusa County

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The University of California Master Gardener Program provides the public with UC research-based information about home horticulture, sustainable landscape and pest management practices. The program is administered by local University of California Cooperative Extension (UCCE) county offices that are the principal outreach and public service arms of the University’s division of Agriculture and Natural Resources.

The UC Master Gardener program supports sustainable gardening practices that protect the environment, conserve natural resources, and take into consideration each gardener's lifestyle and goals.

 

What do UC Master Gardeners do?

UC Master Gardeners are trained to help residents of California become better gardeners. Using a variety of activities such as workshops, lectures, and garden hotlines these volunteers answer questions about home horticulture, sustainable landscaping, and integrated pest management using University of California research-based information.

After their training UC Master Gardeners are qualified to help the public with problems in areas such as:

  • Weed Control
  • Plant Problem Diagnosis
  • Integrated Pest Management (insect and pest control)
  • Soils, fertilizers and irrigation
  • Selecting and caring for fruit and landscape trees
  • Growing annuals, perennials and food crops
  • Lawn care
  • Vegetable Gardening
  • Plant Pathology
  • Composting

 

Each county develops programs to address local needs. Some typical activities are:

  • Using mass media to disseminate gardening information
  • Teaching workshops, or lecturing on gardening practices
  • Participating in research activities with academics within UC
  • Answering gardeners’ questions via email or helplines
  • Speaking to the public on horticultural and gardening topics
  • Manning county fair information booths
  • Consulting with gardeners to improve their landscape practices

 

Find us on Facebook

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Garden Advice and Workshops


Watch for more workshops coming in September!


 

 

Featured Plant

Fescue

California fescue

Perennial

Medium size

California native

Fescue

 

 

Master Gardener Blog

How to Attract Pollinators to Your Garden

A monarch sips nectar from a tropical milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's a great topic. Horticulture experts at the UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden will join forces with the Yolo County Master Gardeners on Sunday, Sept. 24 to present a free workshop on "Pollinator Gardening." The event takes place from 10 a.m. to...

Posted on Friday, September 22, 2017 at 4:15 PM

Do-It-Yourself Bed Bug Control?

Fig 1. Adult and nymph bed bugs. (D.-H. Choe)

[From the Summer issue of the UC IPM Retail Nursery & Garden Center News] Don't let the bed bugs bite? That's easier said than done, it seems. Bed bugs (Figure 1) continue to be important household pests globally, driving a growing sector of the...

Posted on Friday, September 22, 2017 at 10:33 AM
Tags: bed bugs (18), bug bomb (1), control (17), infestation (4), insecticides (2), interceptor (1), mattress encasements (1), monitor (2), pesticide (8), pests (42), Sutherland (7), UC IPM (106)

Pardon Me, Is This My Best Side?

The setting sun backlights the European praying mantis, Mantis religiosa, perched on a passionflower vine. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

She's easy to find. A European praying mantis, Mantis religiosa,  hangs out in our passionflower vine, Passiflora, the host plant of the Gulf Fritillary butterfly. Mantis religiosa is an introduced species, that is, non-native. We introduce...

Posted on Thursday, September 21, 2017 at 4:16 PM
Webmaster Email: colusa@ucanr.edu